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GB domestic rules

Introduction
The GB domestic rules, as contained in the Transport Act 1968, apply to most vehicles that are exempt from the EU rules. Separate rules apply to Northern Ireland.

There are some variations between HGV and PSV GB Domestic Rules, and with this in mind we have seperated them, making them individually available via the internal links within this page. In both cases, they are laid out in their entirety.

HGV Domestic Rules

Exemptions
The following groups are exempt from the domestic drivers' hours rules:

Key Information
Key Information
Day: The day is the 24-hour period beginning with the start of duty time.

Domestic driving limits
Driving is defined as being at the controls of a vehicle for the purposes of controlling its movement, whether it is moving or stationary with the engine running, even for a short period of time.

Daily driving
In any working day the maximum amount of driving permitted is 10 hours. The daily driving limit applies to driving on and off the public road. Off-road driving for the purposes of agriculture, quarrying, forestry, building work or civil engineering counts as duty rather than driving time.

Key Information
Key Information
Duty: In the case of an employee driver, this means being on duty (whether driving or otherwise) for anyone who employs him as a driver. This includes all periods of work and driving, but does not include rest or breaks. Employers should also remember that they have additional obligations to ensure that drivers receive adequate rest under health and safety legislation.
For owner drivers, this means driving a vehicle connected with their business, or doing any other work connected with the vehicle and its load.

Daily duty
In any working day the maximum amount of duty permitted is 11 hours. A driver is exempt from the daily duty limit (11 hours) on any working day when he does not drive. A driver who does not drive for more than 4 hours on each day of the week is exempt from the daily duty limit.

Drivers of certain vehicles are exempt from the duty but not the driving limit, namely goods vehicles, including dual purpose vehicles, not exceeding a maximum permitted gross weight of 3.5 tonnes, when used:

Record keeping
You must keep written records of your hours of work on a weekly record sheet. An example of such a sheet is available for download below. Operators are expected to check and sign each weekly record sheet.

Record books containing weekly record sheets are not available from The Stationery Office. VOSA can provide the names of commercial printers who produce them.
Alternatively, an EU-approved and sealed tachograph may be used to record a driver's activities while he is subject to domestic drivers' hours rules. When recording in this manner, and where domestic records are legally required (see Fig 1. below), all rules on the fitment and use of the tachograph must be complied with

. Where a tachograph is fitted to a vehicle subject to the domestic rules but is not used to produce a legally required record, the operator and driver should nevertheless ensure that the tachograph is properly calibrated and sealed. The tachograph does not have to be recalibrated provided the seals remain intact and the vehicle remains out of scope of the EU rules.

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Exemptions from keeping records
Some groups are exempt from requirements to keep records under domestic rules on drivers' hours. Follow the flowchart below to determine whether you must keep records.

Fig.1
HGV Exemptions

* This exemption does not apply to drivers of Crown vehicles that would have needed an 'O' licence if the vehicle had not been Crown property. If this is the case, answer 'yes' to this question in the flowchart.

** Any off-road driving carried out for the purpose of agriculture, quarrying, forestry, building work, civil engineering or road maintenance does not count towards this total.

Emergencies
The GB domestic rules are relaxed in cases where immediate action is needed to avoid:

In these cases the driving and duty limits are suspended for the duration of the emergency.

Records for vehicles carrying postal articles
Tachographs must be fitted and used on all vehicles with a permissible maximum weight in excess of 3.5 tonnes that carry parcels and letters on postal services. Drivers of such vehicles may be exempt from the EU rules on drivers' hours but, if so, must still comply with the UK domestic rules.

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PSV Domestic Rules

Exemptions
The following exemptions apply to drivers who would otherwise be subject to the GB domestic rules:

Domestic driving limits
Driving is defined as being at the controls of a vehicle for the purposes of controlling its movement, whether it is moving or stationary with the engine running, even for a short period of time.

Breaks and continuous driving

Key Information
Key Information
Day: The day is the 24-hour period beginning with the start of duty time.

Daily driving
In any working day, the maximum amount of driving is 10 hours. The daily driving limit applies to time spent at the wheel, actually driving, and includes any driving done under EU or AETR rules.

Length of working day ('spreadover')
A driver should work no more than 16 hours between the times of starting and finishing work (including work other than driving and off-duty periods during the working day).

Daily rest periods
A continuous rest of 10 hours must be taken between two consecutive working days. This can be reduced to 8.5 hours up to three times a week.

Fortnightly rest periods
In any two consecutive weeks (Monday to Sunday) there must be at least one period of 24 hours off duty.

Record keeping
Under the GB domestic rules on drivers' hours, there is no requirement for drivers of passenger vehicles to keep records. A person driving both passenger and goods vehicles under the domestic rules should keep written records of hours of duty and driving of goods vehicles.

HGV and PSV Common Rules

Travelling abroad
The GB domestic rules apply only in GB, but you must observe the national rules of the countries in which you travel. The embassies of these countries will be able to assist in establishing the rules that might apply.

Mixed vehicle types
If it occurs that a driver divides his time driving goods vehicles and passenger vehicles under GB domestic rules, then in any working day or week, if he spends most of his time driving passenger vehicles then the appropriate GB rules for passenger vehicles apply for that day or week.

Working Time Regulations
Drivers who are subject to the UK domestic rules on drivers' hours are affected by four provisions under the UK's Working Time Regulations 1998 (as amended).

Source - VOSA

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